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Monthly Archives: January 2013

All events are FREE and will take place in the Stedman Gallery

There will be a reception with light refreshments following each event.                                              Parking will be available free of charge in Lots 13 & 14 during the events.

Original 1916 stained glass "Nipper" window from RCA Victor Building; Courtesy of the Camden County Historical Society

Original 1916 stained glass “Nipper” window from RCA Victor Building; Courtesy of the Camden County Historical Society; Photo by Bill Haas

January 29, 12:20 p.m. Lecture: Father Jeff Putthoff

Father Jeff Putthoff, SJ has lived and worked in Camden, NJ for the
last thirteen years. He is the founder and Executive Director of
Hopeworks ‘N Camden, a youth technology portal using the technologies of
web site design/development and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to
work with youth ages 14-23 in Camden New Jersey. Father Puthoff will speak on his role as community leader in Camden and his recent initiative with the symbol of the cross as a way of providing healing and awareness.

February 12 12:20 p.m. Round Table:                                                                                                                                                     Vibiana Cvetkovic and Daniel Sidorick

Vibiana Cvetkovicwill speak about the RCA glass window and Nipper as a mascot;                      Daniel Sidorick will speak about the Campbell Soup water towers.
Daniel Sidorick is the author of Condensed Capitalism: Campbell Soup
and the Pursuit of Cheap Production in the Twentieth Century, published
by Cornell University Press. The New Jersey Historical Commission
awarded the book the Richard P. McCormick Prize. Sidorick has taught at
Temple University, the College of New Jersey, and Rutgers University New
Brunswick, where he is currently teaching a course on the history of New
Jersey workers.

Vibiana Cvetkovic is a Reference Librarian and the head of Access and
Collection Services at the Paul Robeson Library, Rutgers University in
Camden, New Jersey. Ms. Cvetkovic is Chair of the Children and Childhood
Studies Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association,
and an Associate of the Center for Children and Childhood Studies at
Rutgers University.

Moderator:

Charlene Mires Associate Professor of History and Director of the
Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at
Rutgers-Camden.

February 19 12:20 p.m Round Table:                                                                                                                                                 Howard Gillette and Paul Jargowsky


Howard Gillette will speak about Camden’s 2012 homicide rate and the response of the crosses to that calamity. Paul Jargowsky will speak about the Carnegie Library as a symbol of disinvestment in Camden.

Howard Gillette is Professor of History Emeritus at Rutgers
University-Camden, and specialized in modern U.S. history, with a
special interest in urban and regional development. His book, Camden
After the Fall: Decline and Renewal in a Post-Industrial City, also
published by the University of Pennsylvania Press (2005), received best
book awards from the Urban History Association and the New Jersey
Historical Commission.

Paul Jargowsky is Professor of Public Policy and Director, Center for
Urban Research and Urban Education at Rutgers-Camden. His principal
research interests are inequality, the geographic concentration of
poverty, and residential segregation by race and class. Jargowsky has
also been involved in policy development at both the state and federal
levels.

Moderator:

Charlene Mires Associate Professor of History and Director of the
Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at
Rutgers-Camden.

February 14, 4 p.m. Artist’s lecture: Camilo Vergara 

Camilo José Vergara is a Chilean-born, New York-based writer,
photographer and documentarian. Beginning in the 1980s, Vergara applied
the technique of re-photography to a series of American cities,
photographing the same buildings and neighborhoods from the exact
vantage point at regular intervals over many years to capture changes
over time. Camden, NJ is just one of these cities.

February 21, 5 p.m. Fred Barnum

Followed by the Rutgers-Camden Jazz Ensemble

Parking available in lots 13 and 14 free of charge 4-8 p.m.
Fred Barnum, business development manager for Camden’s L-3 Communications Systems, is a Camden County Historical Society Trustee and author of His Master’s Voice In America (1991), an illustrated history of the enterprise that began in 1901 as the Victor Talking Machine Company, then became RCA-Victor.
The Rutgers-Camden Jazz Ensemble, led by Rutgers-Camden Professor Eric Polack, will offer a selection of tunes from the RCA-Victor playlist.

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A View from The Bridge by Mickey McGrath
A View from The Bridge by Mickey McGrath

January 14-March 1 2013

Closed Monday January 21

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 17, 2013

                                      Artist Talk w/Mickey McGrath

                                      3rd Thursday Art Crawl in Camden

Visions of Camden presents varied means of looking at Camden- its past, its present and its possible future – through the filter of lenses turned fleetingly on different times. This exhibit examines moments in the history of the city in a number of different ways: through the eyes of painters and draftsmen through which color and form often return magic to the cityscape. Artifacts from the city’s residential and industrial history, including discoveries from the site of the new Rutgers-Camden dormitory on Cooper Street, will engage visitors in exploring and reconstructing the past.

Postcard: Greetings from Camden
Enlarged Postcard: Greetings from Camden
The oil paintings of William (Bill) M. Hoffman Jr. and the en plein air sketches of Mickey McGrath offer an impressionistic vision of Camden. Suffused with the light that bounces off surfaces, rounding the edges of the views described, awash in warm colors, the paintings and drawings of these visual artists lend the city of Camden the transformative gaze of the earlier Impressionist and post-Impressionist artists. The impressionist gaze transcribed the glance, the fleeting movement of the eyes alighting upon a scene, only to be drawn to the next beckoning view.

The exhibition project Visions of Camden explores this way of looking at Camden, its past, its present, and its possible future through the filter of lenses turned fleetingly on different times. Taking the impressionistic vision as a metaphor, the exhibition offers other visual mediums that have captured the transient at different moments in their technological development. Glass slides, photographs, prints, and digital montages of time-based photography are complemented by other two-dimensional renderings of space and time: maps, postcards and posters that introduce various ways of representing what a city might have been and what it might become. Prying open the ways of knowing—and supplementing the way of knowing offered through visual representations—objects from the city’s history act as windows to the past from which they have been conserved; the glimpses through these windows are also impressionistic in that they cannot provide a complete picture of what was.

Original photograph of the building of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge by George A. Wonfor

Original photograph of the building of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge by George A. Wonfor

From its origins as a ferry landing in the eighteenth century, Camden—named after Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden, an English supporter of constitutional rights for Americans, by Jacob Cooper, a Philadelphia merchant who in 1764 purchased and developed a forty-acre site near where his grandfather William Cooper had settled a century earlier—grew into an industrial powerhouse, the home to well-known enterprises, including RCA Victor and the Campbell Soup Company. Like many northeastern cities, Camden suffered the decline of industry and the departure of many residents to the suburbs following World War II. Today the city and its people, its residents and those who work in the city, are rebuilding a base of educational and medical institutions and strengthening existing neighborhoods. The Stedman Gallery’s exhibition proposes ways of envisioning moments in the history of the city: through the eyes of visual artists whose manipulation of color and form often return magic to the cityscape; and through the more realistic and unforgiving eyes of the photographer’s camera. Artifacts from the city’s residential and industrial history, including discoveries from the site of the new Rutgers-Camden dormitory on Cooper Street, propose glimpses into the domestic life of early, mostly anonymous, residents; the stained-glass Nipper that identified the RCA Victor tower, remounted for this exhibit, signals an enduring icon of the past.

RCA Victrola jigsaw puzzle

RCA Victrola jigsaw puzzle

Through the visual and the material to the knowledge and methodology of academic disciplines, inspired by the art and artifacts on exhibit, community members, historians, archaeologists, and urban policy scholars offer and invite insights into the city’s past and its prospects.

This exhibition is a collaboration between the Stedman Gallery (Rutgers-Camden Center for the Arts) and MARCH (Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities).